The effects of adenotonsillotomy on nocturnal enuresis in snoring children
1 Department of Paediatrics, Preventive Cardiology and Immunology of Developmental Age, Student Study Group, Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
2 Department of Otolaryngology, Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital Research Institute, Łódź, Poland
3 Department of Otolaryngology, Audiology and Paediatric Phoniatrics, Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
4 Department of Paediatrics, Immunology and Nephrology, Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital Research Institute, Łódź, Poland
5 Division of Didactics in Paediatrics, Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Correspondence: Department of Paediatrics, Immunology and Nephrology, Polish Mother’s Memorial Hospital Research Institute, Rzgowska 281/289, 93-338 Łodź, Poland, tel.: +48 42 271 13 94, fax: +48 42 271 13 90, e-mail: mbstanczyk@gmail.com
Pediatr Med Rodz 2017, 13 (4), p. 507–513
DOI: 10.15557/PiMR.2017.0054
ABSTRACT

Introduction: Nocturnal enuresis is a common problem in the paediatric population. A number of reports indicate that there is a relationship between sleep-disordered breathing in children with tonsillar hypertrophy and nocturnal enuresis. Restoration of nasopharyngeal patency may eliminate nocturnal enuresis. Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence of nocturnal enuresis in children snoring due to nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue hypertrophy as well as to assess the effects of restored upper respiratory patency by means of adenectomy and tonsillectomy on the resolution of nocturnal enuresis in children. Material and methods: The study included 50 children with sleep-disordered breathing qualified for adenectomy, tonsillotomy or adenotonsillotomy (median age 7 years). The control group consisted of 20 healthy children (median age 8 years). Children in the study group were assessed prior to surgical procedure as well as 3 and 6 months after surgery. The presence of sleep-disordered breathing and nocturnal enuresis was determined based on author’s questionnaire completed by parents. Results: The incidence of nocturnal enuresis in children with nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue hypertrophy was 18% (M:F 17%:19%; p > 0.05). Nocturnal enuresis was still reported in 6% of children 3 months after tonsillotomy. The disorder resolved in all girls and 97% of boys 6 months after procedure. Conclusions: Sleep-disordered breathing in children with nasopharyngeal lymphatic tissue hypertrophy is associated with nocturnal enuresis. Restoration of nasopharyngeal patency in these patients eliminates nocturnal enuresis. Tonsillar hypertrophy causing obstructive breathing should be included in the differential diagnosis of nocturnal enuresis.

Keywords: nocturnal enuresis, snoring, adenotonsillotomy, children